@proudpakistanii · Mental Health · 1 week ago

Understanding OCD and Turtles All the Way Down

Understanding OCD and Turtles All the Way Down

The internet is a wild place where people say anything they want without giving it much thought. I can't remember the number of times I have seen the phrase "this satisfied my OCD" on the internet. It is often written under pictures of arranged goods. People love simplifying things they know nothing about. Many people today don't even know that there are two different types of disorders associated with obsessions and compulsions. One is a personality disorder: Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder or OCPS while the other is an anxiety disorder: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or OCD. The biggest difference between the two is that one is a personality disorder and the other is an anxiety disorder and if this doesn't make sense to you then you probably shouldn't use OCD's name on the internet to express your happiness. 

When I read John Green's Turtles All the Way Down, I wanted to cry because finally someone was talking about OCD and I could relate to it. John Green himself has OCD so he knows and that book shows that he knows. OCD is not always about aggressive cleaning, it is not always about checking the locks. They are just a couple of symptoms, they are not the whole disorder. It can be different for everyone, yes, but it will always be an anxiety disorder. The obsessions and compulsions are never normal and above all, they keep you anxious all the time. 

For instance, if your compulsion is hand-washing, you will feel compelled to do it even after touching a wall or opening the door. You can't even shake hands with people without worrying about getting your hands dirty. There are some people who didn't like Turtles All the Way Down and that's understandable. It is hard to find something interesting if it is not relatable. But for those with OCD and those who genuinely want to understand the disorder, it is a must-read book. 

The Losing Battle Against Mental Illness

The Losing Battle Against Mental Illness

For centuries the world did not consider mental illnesses real. Some patients were treated by priests, claiming they are possessed by demons. Some had to face torture in the so-called mental asylum..